Sow for yourselves righteousness; reap in mercy; break up your fallow ground, for it is time to seek the LORD, till He comes and rains righteousness on you.

— Hosea 10:12

This verse really sums up well what I have been learning, especially through the opportunity we had this year to have a small garden.

I am not a gardener. At home, poor soil, cold summers, and wind combined to make gardening a futile effort, and after several years of battling against these things, my mother relented and gave up trying to grow vegetables, leaving just one flower bed that was sheltered from the wind.

I was very excited at the opportunity to have a garden here in Stoney Creek, but there were a lot of challenges.

First, we had to decide what to plant. Then we had to plant it - we were blessed to have a staff member till the garden for us, but I was not used to dealing with rabbits, who did their best to eat our beets and peas until we learned how to put chicken wire around them to keep the rabbits out. We also realized that we had planted our beets too close together and they were therefore rather stunted.

Then came the weeds.

At first, not being familiar with the differences between baby plants and weeds, I let both grow together. Then, having learned the difference, we cleared out the weeds.

Then came the portulaca. At home, portulaca is a lovely flower that people take great care to cultivate, but in Stoney Creek it is a dreadful weed. When it first came up, there were thousands of tiny plants, too tiny to possibly pull them all, so we let them grow. Soon, we were overrun.

It took a lot of work to get rid of the portulaca, and we ended up having to hoe out the rows, though of course by then the ground was hard so we were nigh unto needing a pickax. Needless to say, after that, we were more careful to pull them when they were small, however, as we didn't have hours to spend each week in the garden, the best we could do was to keep hoeing the soil to keep it soft, as portulaca doesn't like the soil that way.

Portulaca.jpg

There were many things that the Lord taught me about the spiritual life through this garden, and the weeds.

When I think about the fruit of the Spirit as plants trying to produce fruit, and the sins mentioned in Galatians 5:19-21 as weeds, I understand better, having tended a garden, how important it is to root out the weeds. Here are some things I have learned about weeds: both in the garden and in my own life.

They spread like crazy - just as weeds don't need a special invitation to invade, when I allow one sin -say pride, however small, into my heart, it propagates more - envy, perfectionism, and more pride.

Just because you got rid of every last one last week doesn't mean you get a pass on weeding this week - just because I repented of all of the little sins the Lord revealed to me, doesn't mean that I automatically stop sinning or no longer need to repent.

Weeds take nutrients and moisture away from plants - the sin of pride hinders my prayers, and stunts the growth of the fruits of joy, patience, and peace in my heart

Different environments produce different kinds of weeds - This was especially apparent to me with the portulaca. Portulaca especially likes to grow in hot places, with hard, dry soil. Where other plants struggle it thrives, and makes life harder for other plants. It likes desert-like conditions.

Some sins seem to grow in fertile hearts when everything is going well - such as self confidence, while others grow in stormy seasons - sins like doubt, despair, etc. Others, like portulaca, grow in the desert. These sins, as I have found in my own life, have been self-effort and complacency disguised as patience.

While in the Discipleship Program, I thought that I would grow exponentially in my spiritual walk, and I have grown, but I have also been (and still am) in a 'dry spot', and it's been hard, because you'd think that surrounded by so many opportunities growth would come... easier. And in this dry season, I've noticed that different weeds, different sins than I struggled with before, have started to grow, and they're hard to get rid of. Or perhaps they were always there, but now I know them to be weeds.

In the same way that we had to hoe the ground, to soften it to make it harder for the weeds to grow, the Lord has had to help me soften my heart. It's hard work, and I don't feel like I've made much progress some days. It hurts. It's dusty and there's still thousands of weeds. Some days a little rain comes, and I rejoice. Perhaps righteousness is a bit like potatoes, growing underground, unseen until harvest.

~ Disciple of 2019



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Anne Carol Dyck

 on 10 Dec 2019, 10:20 a.m.

There are so many life lessons to learn through gardening. That was a great devotional! Thank you for sharing... Did you know that portuluca is considered very edible and a delicacy in some countries by it's other name? It is also nutritious...Bless you as you keep growing...! Anne 🌹






“He comes to His garden to enjoy its fruit.”

— Chuck Smith

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The Christian is saved by believing and trusting in God. This produces fruit in their life. Yet so often I get confused and think producing fruit is what saves me or gives me a better standing before God and others.

But think of a tree: this tree produces fruit faithfully every year. Its fruit does nothing for the tree. If the tree depended on its fruit it would die. The fruit is only good for the enjoyment of others and for producing more trees. So what then saves the tree? The water and nutrients in the soil! The tree did nothing to put them there, nor can it maintain them there. It only connects itself to them and trusts that they will give it all it needs and by them it is able to produce fruit.

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Before coming to the Discipleship Program, I struggled often with wanting my works to be recognized by others and by God. I wanted to be noticed and known. I still do. I see pride creeping up in my heart probably every day. But the months I’ve spent away from home in this community environment have taught me a few things:

God showed me the ugliness of my sin; that there was nothing good in my heart, and that though I longed to change, I could not. He also taught me that He still loved me, no matter how sinful I am and that He wanted to change me if I would let Him. I was humbled over and over again in watching the selflessness of others, in the way they loved God and served me as well. I knew I wasn’t like them, but I wanted to be and as I strive to be more others-focused, I find a greater joy.
St. Paul said this to the Philippians:

“But whatever were gains to me I now consider loss for the sake of Christ. What is more, I consider everything a loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord, for whose sake I have lost all things. I consider them garbage that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but which is through faith in Christ – the righteousness that comes from God on the basis of faith.”

— Philippians 3:7-9

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I know I’m not there yet. I haven’t lost all things for Christ-there are many things I hang onto, thinking and hoping they will do me some good. But as C.S. Lewis says, “Nothing that you have not given away will be really yours. Nothing in you that has not died will ever be raised from the dead.”

I pray that I can give away all things and be able to say like St. Paul, “I consider them garbage that I may gain Christ.”

I want to be “like a tree planted by streams of water, which yields its fruit in its season and whose leaf does not wither” and in this way may the fruit that my relationship with Christ produces bring glory and enjoyment to God.


Written by a Discipleship Program Student



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