Missionaries Tracts and booklets are valued more in Asian cultures because there is less access to literature. Tracts are usually read by not just one person, but an entire family, and even passed on to neighbors.

On June 28, more than 20 Gospel for Asia missionaries filled shoulder bags with Gospel tracts and New Testaments, gathered together for prayer and set out for a day of evangelism in India-controlled Kashmir.

Jammu and Kashmir, the northernmost state of India, became part of India 60 years ago this week, when the country won its independence from Britain. However, newly independent Pakistan immediately invaded Kashmir and still controls the northern half of the state today. The line dividing Kashmir is called the Line of Control.

After driving two hours, the missionaries reached a tourist city near a lake. Playing a keyboard and a guitar, they attracted a crowd, and then they distributed Gospel tracts and shared the Gospel message with as many as they could.

Some of the people they met were hesitant. Others tore the tracts up, but the missionaries kept going, because they knew God could work even in those who are resistant or hard-hearted.

Later they drove to the Line of Control for further outreach. A festival celebrated by both Indians and Pakistanis was taking place when they arrived, and huge crowds had gathered. It was the perfect opportunity for sharing the Gospel. Some of the people they met were hesitant. Others tore the tracts up, but the missionaries kept sharing, because they knew God could work even in those who are resistant or hard-hearted.

At the end of the day, they had distributed nearly 1,500 Gospel tracts and booklets. These missionaries ask that you pray that those who read the tracts will be convinced of the truth and receive Jesus as Savior and Lord.

The missionaries traveled to Kashmir from their Bible college in Jammu.